An introduction to the various symptoms of coronary heart disease

The American Heart Association AHA reports that people who have both high blood pressure and diabetes double their risk for cardiovascular disease. Also, men are at greater risk for heart disease than women.

An introduction to the various symptoms of coronary heart disease

Despite the increasing sophistication of surgical techniques, the introduction of new techniques such as balloon angioplasty, and a number of new drugs e.

In short, we do not have an adequate therapeutic solution to the problem of myocardial infarction heart attack.

Heart Failure in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Integrative Review

The cornerstone of therapy for treatment and prevention of myocardial infarction is to remove blockages in coronary arteries that are thought to be the cause of the infarction.

This adheres to the widely accepted coronary artery thrombosis theory of infarction; that is, arteries become clogged with plaque, damaged from such things as smoking or high cholesterol. A clot forms a fissure in the plaque. The clot may shut off the blood flow of the coronary artery, causing a heart attack.

It is deceptively simple: The coronary arteries are clogged. No blood can flow, so the muscles of the heart cannot be supported, and heart metabolism stops, leading to death.

In Germany, another theory of myocardial infarction has been proposed by Dr. Kern, while performing autopsies in Germany in the s and s, observed that the findings of these autopsies did not corroborate the coronary obstruction hypothesis.

He began researching the literature, looking for clues as to an alternative etiology. What he found was not only a new theory that may provide the missing piece of the coronary obstruction theory, but a therapy now being used by over physicians in Germany with reportedly remarkable success.

Kern's claims, as set forth in his informational paper, Three Ways to Cardiac Infarction, can be summarized as follows: The coronary obstruction theory cannot adequately explain observed facts.

The major etiologic factor underlying myocardial infarction is a primary chemical destructive process, cause by unchecked metabolic acidosis accumulation of acid in the left ventricular tissue and substantially unrelated to coronary artery disease.

The regular, clinical use of oral g-strophathin a cardiac glycoside derived from the West African plant strophanthus gratus: Sinceover a dozen reports of post-mortem examination of infracted hearts have consistently failed to corroborate the coronary artery thrombosis theory of myocardial infarction.

That is, victims of fatal heart attacks have had no evidence whatsoever of coronary occlusion. An example of the degree of non-confirmation can be ascertained by the following quote from a article on Circulation: Another source of inconsistent data are the many reports in the literature of myocardial infarction in patients without coronary artery disease, as deduced by normal coronary angiograms.

Other autopsy data has revealed widely scattered areas of necrotic tissue that produces a substantial incongruence between the area of infarction and the arterial supply. Kern went a step further. In his review of the literature, he came across the notion of collaterals or anastomosesa finely-meshed network of small blood vessels that act as natural bypass channels in the heart muscle.

Baroldi developed a technique for filling the arteries of the heart with artificial blood, a chemical substance that thickens in the blood vessels. When later the tissues were dissolved in acid, the entire structure of blood vessels in the heart was revealed.

Kern hypothesized that bypass grafts were created naturally by the body via the collaterals whenever a coronary artery became blocked.

Therefore, heart bypass would be redundant to a large degree. In an accompanying editorial, Dr. Interestingly, they observed that the more the coronaries narrow, the less danger there is of heart infarction. Metabolic conditions in the most healthy of hearts are, at best, marginal in the constantly beating left ventricle.

This is the part of the heart responsible for pumping blood to most of the body, the right ventricle merely supplying the lungs.

Lack of oxygen sets off the process of zymosis or fermentation metabolism, an anaerobic process, in order to produce energy in the cells.Heart conditions: Introduction. Heart conditions include a wide variety of diseases, disorders and conditions that affect the heart and sometimes the blood vessels as well.

Heart disease, or cardiovascular disease, encompasses a range of conditions, including blood vessel diseases such as coronary artery disease, problems with heart rhythm (arrhythmias) and.

Coronary artery disease is currently the leading cause of death in the United States. Despite the increasing sophistication of surgical techniques, the introduction of new techniques such as balloon angioplasty, and a number of new drugs (e.g.

An introduction to the various symptoms of coronary heart disease

beta blockers, calcium antagonists), it is estimated that over 1 million heart attacks will occur this year, resulting in , deaths. Low-fat, high-carbohydrate diets have been widely recommended as a way to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease because populations with low intakes of saturated and total fat tend to be at.

Introduction. Heart failure (HF) is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and is strongly associated with mortality in these patients.

However, the treatment of HF in this population is largely unclear.

Coronary heart disease - causes, symptoms, prevention - Southern Cross NZ

Study Design. We conducted a systematic integrative review of the literature to assess the current evidence of HF treatment in CKD. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In the United States, 1 in every 4 deaths in is the result of a.

Heart Failure in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Integrative Review